Author Archives: Rowena

Poke bowls in italian supermarkets?

Walking into Iperal supermarket (Calolziocorte) earlier this month I see this out of the corner of my eye and stopped dead in my tracks. WHAT? They’re serving (or had been serving since summer is now over) this most treasured of Hawaiian quick meals? Now I’m going to assume that everyone knows what poke bowls are, but if by some stroke of bad intel you really don’t, here’s a little primer in 50 shades of poke. You simply fill a bowl with rice and top with poke of choice, like this:

Poke Gorilla Bowl
The ‘Gorilla Bowl’ (no, it does not have ape!) from Makai Sushi in Kukui’ula Market, Kauai.

I was drawn to the first one – Hamachi & salsa Ponzu (12.90€) – but unless they’re keeping them on the autumn menu, I’ll most likely have to make my own.

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Slow Food Cheese: food trucks, street food, and beer

Molisani street food

Visiting the cheese stands can be quite exhausting if you’re gung ho on seeing/tasting from every single vendor. In earlier editions of Cheese there were street food stands for a quick bite (if the lines hadn’t formed yet), but from 2015 up til now, food trucks are also part of the food-to-go scene. Event organizers did a strategic move this year in grouping food trucks and beer stands together in one big section. Brilliant! There were only a few operators, but one caught my eye immediately when I saw this guy fiddling with a dangling caciocavallo.

Caciocavallo impiccato

At street food Molisani there was an item named Impiccato (hanged) – caciocavallo cheese on toasted bread, topped with preserved garlic scapes and wild asparagus. Suspended above an electric hob, the caciocavallo cheese was lowered until melted and bubbly, then scraped onto a slice of bread. Totally mesmerizing, titillating, tantalizing food porn.

Poormanger

Another food truck to check off my list was Poormanger. They do amazing gourmet baked potatoes (something that I’ve never seen here actually) and who doesn’t love a steaming hot spud? Like this one here with fresh tomino cheese, anchovies, and italian green sauce. It was HUGE! And it was excellent with a cold one from a beer stand less than 10 feet away from us.

Acciughe al verde

Food, beer, and cheese shopping behind us, the perfect end to the day was at the Piazza del Gelato. One flavor in particular was unexpectedly delicious: farina bona. Farina bona is a type of corn flour from Ticino (Switzerland) and the taste was like toasted corn. Almost, but not quite, like really good popcorn that you get at a county fair. I think it would’ve paired well with salted butter caramel gelato but that’s for another project. Now we simply wait another 2 years for the 12th edition of Slow Food Cheese in 2019.

Slow Food Cheese gourmet gelato

11th edition of Slow Food Cheese: the coolest ever

French cheese display

Cheese: pungent, spicy, sweet, hard, soft, creamy, fresh, aged, and the list goes on and on. Like every single edition in previous years, the Slow Food Cheese fair this past weekend was an enormous success, attracting visitors in the hundreds of thousands. The layout was pretty much the same as 2015 with a few new additions: an area for food trucks and beer stands, and a gelato stand that had this amaaaazing toasted corn flavor.

We went on Friday, opening day, just before lunch. In my opinion it is the best day to go if you want to have a look around, nibble, taste, and stock up without feeling as if the hoards have already been there before you. The pressing crowds have yet to arrive (the shuttle bus to and from was practically empty on our ride) and the whole town of Bra has a nice, clean feel to it. A big plus was the weather which was much cooler in comparison to past events.

Slow Food cheese stash

Firm, semi-firm: Keen’s cheddar and Stichelton (UK), Montébore and Macagn (Italy). New to us is the Stichelton, which is similiar to Stilton but uses raw cow’s milk instead.

Slow Food cheese stash

Soft, semi-soft and downright oozing: Anneau des Gors and Figuettine (France), Tartucrem (Italy), Capri Algas (Spain). With the exception of the Tartucrem (truffles and soft gorgonzola) the remaining 3 goat cheeses are already half gone. Capri Algas has flecks of seaweed in it, and hidden within the Figuettine is a candied fig!

Figuettine
Figuettine

Caprí Algas Bahía de Cádiz
Caprí Algas Bahía de Cádiz: oozy goat’s milk cheese with seaweed.

Anyone who went to/blogged Slow Food Cheese 2017 is welcome to add a link to their post in the comments!