Tag Archives: italian cheese

11th edition of Slow Food Cheese: the coolest ever

Cheese: pungent, spicy, sweet, hard, soft, creamy, fresh, aged, and the list goes on and on. Like every single edition in previous years, the Slow Food Cheese fair this past weekend was an enormous success, attracting visitors in the hundreds of thousands. The layout was pretty much the same as 2015 with a few new additions: an area for food trucks and beer stands, and a gelato stand that had this amaaaazing toasted corn flavor.

We went on Friday, opening day, just before lunch. In my opinion it is the best day to go if you want to have a look around, nibble, taste, and stock up without feeling as if the hoards have already been there before you. The pressing crowds have yet to arrive (the shuttle bus to and from was practically empty on our ride) and the whole town of Bra has a nice, clean feel to it. A big plus was the weather which was much cooler in comparison to past events.

Firm, semi-firm: Keen’s cheddar and Stichelton (UK), Montébore and Macagn (Italy). New to us is the Stichelton, which is similiar to Stilton but uses raw cow’s milk instead.

Soft, semi-soft and downright oozing: Anneau des Gors and Figuettine (France), Tartucrem (Italy), Capri Algas (Spain). With the exception of the Tartucrem (truffles and soft gorgonzola) the remaining 3 goat cheeses are already half gone. Capri Algas has flecks of seaweed in it, and hidden within the Figuettine is a candied fig!


Figuettine


Caprí Algas Bahía de Cádiz: oozy goat’s milk cheese with seaweed.

Anyone who went to/blogged Slow Food Cheese 2017 is welcome to add a link to their post in the comments!

Veneto unpacked (and served)


Clockwise starting from top left: broccolo fiolaro, polenta, sarde alla veneziana, frico morbido, folpetti alla busara, bacala alla vicentina (center), asiago cheese

Prepackaged heat-n-serve meals go against my line of thinking when it comes to italian meals, but sometimes the aesthetics of cooking takes a back seat when all we want is just a little taste. Over the weekend we dug into some foods purchased on our way out of Veneto and all I know is this – we just gotta get back to the region again.

To start: sarde alla veneziana (sardines, venetian-style with onions and vinegar) and young asiago cheese with onion compote. I love onion anything.

Polenta 2 ways: baccala cooked in milk and baby octopus in a richly-flavored tomato sauce. The polenta is sliced from a thick slab and warmed on an oiled skillet until heated through.

Vegetable: broccolo fiolaro (a local variety of broccoli) and hard-boiled eggs. Cultivated in the Vicenza province, it has a vague sweet note and you can also eat the leaves. Enjoy it steamed or boiled with a little salt, pepper and olive oil.

More cheese. And potato. All in a flat, hot, delicious little round. Who can resist anything that has potato and cheese? Frico morbido is actually from the Friuli region and one of the best things to eat on a gloomy spring day. Just make sure not to burn your mouth!