Category Archives: desserts

Emergency stroopwafel made with a pizzelle iron

This morning when I realized that my stash of honey wafers was down to a single package, I went in a mild panic because these have been my afternoon ‘comfort’ food along with some tea. I love Verival’s honey version as it’s not as sweet as the butter and sugar syrup-filled ones (although I like those too), but I thought it would be a good idea to have a recipe on hand as backup.

I adapted a wafer recipe from a youtube video to suit my needs and my measuring cups. For the filling, I simply used honey and spread the desired amount. They won’t win any prizes in the beauty department, but my round pizzelle iron gets another use and I won’t need to worry the next time my stroopwafel stash runs out.

Recipe:
1 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 1/4 teaspoon instant yeast
1/8 cup warm milk
1/3 cup sugar
1 stick (4 oz.) butter, melted and cooled
1 small egg, beaten

Combine all ingredients together in a bowl and stir until thoroughly combined. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and gently knead until smooth. Place dough back into bowl and let rest, covered, in a warm place for 30 minutes.

After dough has rested, divide into 10 equal portions and roll into balls. Cook each ball in a pre-heated pizzelle iron, about 30-35 seconds each side, until golden brown. Trim (using a knife or large round cookie cutter) and split each wafer as soon as they’re cool enough to handle; fill and spread with honey of your choice. Store in an airtight container.

The video that inspired all this is in German and uses metric measurements. I selected a snippet of the clip that shows a truly elegant-looking wafer maker, something that I’d love to have in my collection of gadgets if my kitchen ever gets bigger.

Chestnut fever


Large marroni for 5,99โ‚ฌ/kilo

We’ve had them oven-roasted, boiled, turned into puree, cooked in rice (kurigohan style), and I think I’ll try dipping some in chocolate tonight. This was a terrific year for chestnuts, but even though the harvest has ended in our neighborhood, supermarkets will likely have them stocked for at least another few weeks.

I bought 13 of the large marroni variety. Enormous and beautiful, yhey’re quite impressive next to the chestnuts I collect here. Yet every single time, no matter where I get them from, most turn out rotten inside and not usable at all.


One of the marroni next to the dachshund’s paw!

But as I’ve said, you don’t always get what you expect. Marroni are easier to peel, yet out of the thirteen, 2 turned out perfect with another 2 partially blemished. You can see a couple of rejects in the container.

Prepping for a Mont Blanc dessert: homemade chestnut puree, freshly whipped cream, finely chopped candied chestnuts. I’ll add my non-recipe for the puree at the end.


I take shortcuts wherever necessary, so store-purchased sponge cake layers it is!

3-inch sponge cake cut-outs filled with a whipped cream/chopped chestnut mixture. Half of a boiled chestnut on top, dollop of whipped cream, and silly chestnut string to finish. Sweet bliss.

To make the puree: place 2 heaping cups of unpeeled chestnuts in a large pot of water, bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Drain, cut chestnuts in half, squeeze/scoop out the flesh into a clean pot. If cooked well enough, the flesh will be crumbly.

Cover the cooked chestnuts with milk and bring to a simmer; continue to cook for about 20 minutes then sweeten to taste (taste the milk) with granulated or brown sugar.

Strain mixture (you can save the delicious milk for breakfast granola) and scoop into the container of an immersion blender. Blend until smooth, adding a tiny amount of milk if it is too stiff (you want a consistency that will pipe easily but not be too runny). Press the puree through a fine mesh sieve; store and refrigerate in an airtight container. Will keep for up to 3 days.