Seaweed from Spain

Porto-Muiños

Our fishmonger regularly sends out emails on news updates and events, so some of that much-needed retail therapy mentioned in the previous post prompted me to check out a new line of seaweed items from spanish company Porto-Muiños. Apparently they’ve received many awards for their galician sea products and are definitely on the fast track to becoming a business catering to gourmet tastes.

The fish shop had a small area dedicated to all things seaweed and non, ranging from teas (rooibus with kombu?!) to seasoned rice for risotto. There was a variety of dried seaweed, some of which I had never even heard of, and pasta, among other things. Unfortunately, gourmet usually means more cha-ching at the register, so I got a package of tagliatelle with nori, a tin of monkfish liver, seaweed tartar and dried irish moss. So far I’ve only tried the seaweed tartar which looks somewhat like wet tea leaves. It contains gherkins, onions and capers which gives it a pickled flavor that is too strong for my taste (one of the suggestions says to serve it on toast), but stirred into spaghetti along with sauteed mushrooms balances out some of that sour tang.

Spaghetti with seaweed tartare

I’ve tried mixing a spoonful into beaten eggs for a tasty breakfast scramble, but I think the pickle-flavor factor also deems it perfect right on top of un perro caliente. Would that then turn it into a foodie’s gourmet seadog?

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6 thoughts on “Seaweed from Spain

  1. Midge

    I can imagine how good all that seaweed would taste on hotdogs, pasta, dips, and sandwiches! Plus, I think thy could also throw in a bit of umami to soups.

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    1. Rowena Post author

      The seaweed certainly did give a little something special to a bowl of minestrone and most definitely am I going to try it on top of a hotdog….along with ketchup, mustard and maybe some shredded cheese!

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    1. Rowena Post author

      I’ve heard nothing but raves on monkfish but never on how it was prepared/served, so….we went with the suggestion on the packaging and spread it (or at least tried to) on baguette slices. We weren’t impressed at all. It’s definitely not spreadable and tasted like trout. Not sure if the reason is because it’s canned or what, but I was expecting a unique flavor (like when you taste uni). Other suggestions includes using it as a garnish or served white rice? There’s still some leftover so if I can find daikon at the super, I’ll give it another go with sliced green onions and ponzu sauce (as shown in the ever-reliable Wikipedia).

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    1. Rowena Post author

      That would work too, especially the boiled egg salad since one of the suggested uses was to make a sort of seaweed-enhanced deviled egg. Now I need some bread.

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